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« MADISON AVE WON WITH THIS TAG LINE | Main | MOORE’S HAVE IT WRAPPED UP IN SEATTLE »

September 15, 2022

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Piniella broke so many bats and smashed so many drinking fountains in his minor-league days that he was not considered an especially promising major league prospect. When he started to get his temper under control he was the 1969 American League Rookie of the Year and went onto play until 1984 when he retired with a lifetime batting average of nearly .300 (.291). However, he actually performed better in high- pressure World Series play with the New York Yankees--22 games over 4 different years in the Series with a batting average of .319. But in the first of what's generally become a long litany of bad Seattle baseball trades, the original Seattle Pilots traded Piniella on April Fool's Day 1969 to fellow debut team the Kansas City Royals for two players who each were out of the major leagues after the next year, 1970.

More on Lou Piniella (pt.2). After nearly three years managing the Yankees in the late '80s he replaced Pete Rose as Cincinnati's manager and skippered the Reds to the 1990 World Series title over Oakland. After that he was off to Seattle for several years where he led the Mariners to four postseason appearances, including 2001 when the Mariners tied an all-time one season record for wins with 116. As a manager he won 1835 games and retired with over 1700 career hits. He's now retired and playing with grandchildren in Tampa Bay, where he grew up.

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